10 of the most Famous American Newspaper Comics

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Newspaper comics are one of the three main formats of modern comics, the other two being comic books and graphic novels. Newspaper comics are much shorter than comic books and graphic novels, occupying at most one full page, which places a limit on how complex their narratives can be. This was compensated for from their first appearance in 1895 until World War II, when a comic would frequently occupy a full tabloid-sized newspaper page, especially on Sundays. The great newspaper comics took full advantage of this opportunity to create miniature panoramas that were accessible to workers and the poor in a way that high art was not. Sadly, after World War II the full-page newspaper comic disappeared, replaced by much smaller strips, which shrank even further in the twenty-first century as the newspaper industry as a whole went into decline.


Gasoline Alley

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Gasoline Alley is a comic strip created by Frank King and distributed by Tribune Content Agency. It centers on the lives of patriarch Walt Wallet, his family, and residents in the town of Gasoline Alley, with storylines reflecting American conservative values.


Krazy Kat

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Blondie

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Blondie is an American comic strip created by cartoonist Chic Young. The comic strip is distributed by King Features Syndicate, and has been published in newspapers since September 8, 1930.[1] The success of the strip, which features the eponymous blonde and her sandwich-loving husband, led to the long-running Blondie film series (1938–1950) and the popular Blondie radio program (1939–1950).


Mary Worth

Mary Worth is an American newspaper comic strip that has had an eight-decade run from 1938. Distributed by King Features Syndicate, this pioneering soap opera-style strip influenced several that followed. It was created by writer Allen Saunders and artist Dale Connor, initially appeared under the pseudonym "Dale Allen". Ken Ernst succeeded Connor as artist in 1942.


Calvin & Hobbs

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Hi and Lois

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Mother Goose and Grimm

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Mother Goose and Grimm is an internationally syndicated comic strip by cartoonist Mike Peters of the Dayton Daily News. It was first syndicated in 1984, and is distributed by King Features Syndicate to 500 newspapers.


10 Classic Works of Nineteenth Century Photography

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Since the mid-nineteenth century, photography was considered an objective representation of reality, despite its limitations with regard to capturing color or movement and its capacity for manipulation. The discovery of photography was announced publicly in January 1839 at the Academy of Sciences in Paris. The artist and inventor of the diorama Louis-Jacques-Mandé Daguerre was credited with the invention of what became known as the daguerreotype (a unique photographic image captured on a highly-polished surface of a copper plate.) Canonical surveys of photography often celebrate Daguerre as the inventor of photography, even though there had been numerous earlier experiments to fix the image of the camera obscura (latin for “dark room,” an optical device in the form of a room or box through which an image of nature is projected onto a screen by means of light passing through a pinhole.).


View from the Window at Le Gras by Joseph Nicéphore Niépce

View from the Window at Le Gras, (1826 or 1827) by Joseph Nicéphore Niépce

View from the Window at Le Gras, (1826 or 1827) by Joseph Nicéphore Niépce


Home of a Rebel Sharpshooter by Alexander Gardner

Alexander Gardner,  Home of a Rebel Sharpshooter , 1863

Alexander Gardner, Home of a Rebel Sharpshooter, 1863


Déjatch Alámayou, King Theodore's Son by Julia Margaret Cameron

Déjatch Alámayou, King Theodore's Son (1868) by Julia Margaret Cameron

Déjatch Alámayou, King Theodore's Son (1868) by Julia Margaret Cameron


The Horse in Motion by Eadweard Muybridge

The Horse in Motion , 1878 by  Eadweard Muybridge

The Horse in Motion, 1878 by Eadweard Muybridge


Two Ways of Life by Oscar Gustave Rejlander

Two Ways of Life, 1857 Oscar Gustave Rejlander

Two Ways of Life, 1857 Oscar Gustave Rejlander


Julia Jackson by Julia Margaret Cameron

Julia Jackson, 1867 Julia Margaret Cameron

Julia Jackson, 1867 Julia Margaret Cameron

Cameron’s photograph of her niece Julia Jackson concentrates on the subject’s head, showing clearly only limited planes of her face and leaving half of it shrouded in shadow. Known as a great beauty, Jackson was a favorite subject for Cameron, who made dozens of photographs of her. In April 1867, a month before Jackson’s wedding to her first husband, Herbert Duckworth, Cameron photographed the young bride-to-be. With her hair down and eyes wide, she is unsentimental, looking forward with purpose to her own personal and social transformation.


Big River, from the Rancherie, Mendocino, California by Carleton Watkins

Big River, from the Rancherie, Mendocino, California, 1863  by Carleton Watkins

Big River, from the Rancherie, Mendocino, California, 1863 by Carleton Watkins

Like the vast and untapped landscape of the American West, Carleton Watkins’s photographic images are grand in spirit and in size. Using a giant wet-plate camera whose thick glass negatives—coated with a sensitized emulsion called collodion and exposed while still wet—were often as large as the average easel painting of the time, Watkins here fused a sense of the picturesque with a Romantic expression of nature’s timelessness, immensity, and silence. The trees are sharply defined, still, and majestic. Depicted with equal clarity is the river, which winds into the receding hills. Photographs such as Big River and Watkins’s famous views of Yosemite (which helped persuade the US Congress to pass legislation protecting the valley’s wilderness) provided the world with some of the first glimpses of the American West.


Le Geant, Champ de Mars by Nadar (Gaspard Félix Tournachon)

Le Geant, Champ de Mars, 1863  by Nadar (Gaspard Félix Tournachon)

Le Geant, Champ de Mars, 1863 by Nadar (Gaspard Félix Tournachon)

Nadar cultivated an illustrious career as a writer, caricaturist, and, most notably, photographer, producing arresting portraits of his renowned friends and contemporaries. He was also an enthusiastic balloonist, an obsession that led him to construct the largest hot air balloon the world had seen and make the first aerial photographs in 1858. Viewing the Earth’s surface from above, he wrote, "reduces all things to their relative proportions—to the Truth." Nadar’s first flight aboard his balloon Géant (Giant) on October 4, 1863, was a great success. On the second launch, however, the balloon eventually crashed in Hanover, leaving Nadar with a fractured leg. This photograph of that launch establishes the sheer size of the balloon—which was made with 20,000 meters of silk and carried 80 passengers in a two-story basket—by juxtaposing it with the crowd of 200,000 who have come to watch it.


An Icy Night, New York by Alfred Stieglitz

An Icy Night, New York, 1898  Alfred Stieglitz

An Icy Night, New York, 1898 Alfred Stieglitz


A Venetian Canal by Alfred Stieglitz

A Venetian Canal, 1894 Alfred Stieglitz

A Venetian Canal, 1894 Alfred Stieglitz


History of Comic Art

The exact definition of what makes something a comic has been a matter of some dispute among comics scholars. A rough definition is that comics use a combination of words and images in sequential panels to tell a story. Comics are differentiated from illustrations, in which the narrative is conveyed primarily through the text and the text and images are visually separated; comics interweave text and images and rely equally on both. Comic strips, comic books, and graphic novels are all examples of comics.

Trina Robbins, cover of  It Ain’t Me Babe , July 1970

Trina Robbins, cover of It Ain’t Me Babe, July 1970

Comics is a medium used to express ideas through images, often combined with text or other visual information. Frequently, comics takes the form of sequences of panels of images. Often textual devices such as speech balloons, captions, and onomatopoeia indicate dialogue, narration, sound effects, or other information. The size and arrangement of panels contribute to narrative pacing. Cartooning and similar forms of illustration are the most common image-making means in comics; fumetti is a form which uses photographic images. Common forms include comic strips, editorial and gag cartoons, and comic books.

The history of comics has followed different paths in different cultures. Scholars have posited a pre-history as far back as the Lascaux cave paintings in France. By the mid-20th century, comics flourished, particularly in the United States, western Europe (especially France and Belgium), and Japan. The history of European comics is often traced to Rodolphe Töpffer's cartoon strips of the 1830s, but the medium truly became popular in the 1930s following the success of strips and books such as The Adventures of Tintin. American comics emerged as a mass medium in the early 20th century with the advent of newspaper comic strips; magazine-style comic books followed in the 1930s, in which the superhero genre became prominent after Superman appeared in 1938.


5 examples of homosexuality in renaissance art

The Renaissance, inspired by the rediscovery of the philosophy and art of the Classical period, was also a new dawn for homoerotic expression. A male's desire for another male was primarily constructed as an adult's desire for an adolescent, beardless youth.


Wheat Field with Cypresses by Vincent Van Gogh

Wheat Field with Cypresses (1889) by Vincent Van Gogh

Wheat Field with Cypresses (1889) by Vincent Van Gogh

Wheat Field with Cypresses by Vincent van Gogh features several motifs often explored by the artists in his landscape depictions. These include towering trees, swirling clouds, and rolling hills. In a letter to his brother, Theo, van Gogh describes the painting. “I have a canvas of cypresses with some ears of wheat, some poppies, a blue sky like a piece of Scotch plaid; the former painted with a thick impasto like the Monticelli’s, and the wheat field in the sun, which represents the extreme heat, very thick too.”


View of Toledo by El Greco

El Greco   ,     View of Toledo    , c. 1596–1600, oil on canvas,    Metropolitan Museum of Art   ,    New York

A Storm in the Rocky Mountains, Mt. Rosalie by Albert Bierstadt

A Storm in the Rocky Mountains, Mt. Rosalie, oil on canvas by Albert Bierstadt, 1866; in the Brooklyn Museum, New York City

A Storm in the Rocky Mountains, Mt. Rosalie, oil on canvas by Albert Bierstadt, 1866; in the Brooklyn Museum, New York City

Albert Bierstadt, a German-American painter associated with the Hudson River School movement, took many journeys to the American West, which inspired him to depict the rugged beauty of the great outdoors. Accordingly, he is also considered a member of the Rocky Mountain School art movement.

Some of Bierstadt’s most stirring works include “Yosemite Valley, Yosemite Park” which he completed around 1868 and which now hands in the Oakland Museum in Oakland, California, and the breathtaking “Storm in the Mountains,” finished around 1870. Other scenes inspired by nature are his “Lake Tahoe” and “San Francisco Bay.”


The Hay Wain by John Constable

The Hay Wain (1821) by John Constable

The Hay Wain (1821) by John Constable


Mont Sainte-Victoire by Paul Cezanne

Mont Sainte-Victoire, 1885-1887 by Paul Cezanne

Mont Sainte-Victoire, 1885-1887 by Paul Cezanne

Sainte-Victoire, a mountain in the South of France, remained Post-Impressionist painter Paul Cézanne’s preferred subject matter for years. In his series of oil paintings portraying the landform, he experiments with different views, color palettes, and perspectives to produce a comprehensive look at the mountain and its surrounding landscape. In this depiction from 1837, he frames the scene with trees in the foreground and a village in the distance.


View from Mount Holyoke, Northampton, Massachusetts, After A Thunderstorm by Thomas Cole

View from Mount Holyoke, Northampton, Massachusetts, After A Thunderstorm (1836) by Thomas Cole

View from Mount Holyoke, Northampton, Massachusetts, After A Thunderstorm (1836) by Thomas Cole



Poppy Field, Giverny by Claude Monet

Poppy Field, Giverny (1890–1891) by      Claude Monet     . Original from the Art Institute of Chicago

Poppy Field, Giverny (1890–1891) by Claude Monet. Original from the Art Institute of Chicago


Christina's World by Andrew Wyeth

Christina's World (1948) by Andrew Wyeth

Christina's World (1948) by Andrew Wyeth

Perhaps because it has been misunderstood as a depiction of teenage angst, for decades Christina's World was a dorm room poster staple. The woman actually depicted in the painting is Christina Olson, a woman who was paralyzed from the waist down as a result of a degenerative disease.


How politics shape art and art shapes politics

Cuno, James, ed. Whose Culture? The Promise of Museums and the Debate Over Antiquities. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2012.

  • Nicholas, Lynn, H. The Rape of Europa: The Fate of Europe’s Treasures in the Third Reich and the Second World War. New York: Knopf, 1995. (There is also a documentary film based on the book: Berge, Richard, Nicole Newnham, Bonni Cohen, Robert M. Edsel, Jon Shenk, Joan Allen, and Lynn H. Nicholas. The rape of Europa. [Venice, CA]: Menemsha Films, 2008.)

  • Miles, Margaret, M. Art as Plunder: The Ancient Origins of Debate about Cultural Property. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2010.











8 queer art masterpieces by 4 brilliant LGBTQ artists you should know

In recent decades, art historians have contextualized images of homosexuality and homoeroticism that appear throughout the history of art and visual culture, revising and expanding our understanding of representations of same-sex desire, romance, and companionship. A global survey of queer art would include art from Greece, Rome, China Peru, India, Mexico, as well as the medieval, Renaissance, and early modern periods.

So what exactly makes a work of art “queer”? While there’s no such category as queer art per se,

Kehinde Wiley is another artist who has mined art history to create new, empowering images of gender, race and sexuality. Born in 1977 in Los Angeles, Wiley is known for his naturalistic and heroic portraits of people of color, many of which are sourced from Old Master paintings. Wiley uses a “street casting” process; he approaches young men on the street, invites them to his studio to look through art history books, lets them choose an image, then paints their picture in a powerful pose while the models remain in their street clothes. The result is larger-than-life paintings with highly patterned backgrounds that ask us to rethink our assumptions about masculinity and art history. The models remain anonymous, and the titles are derived from their art historical source.











8 classic landscape paintings that will take you to another place

Landscape painting (or landscape art) refers to an artistic genre defined by a focus on natural scenery as subject matter. Landscape paintings can depict a variety of settings, such as mountains, forests, rivers, and beaches. They often offer a wide view of the scene, and usually place some focus on the sky.

Artists often draw their inspiration from nature. Many of them will take their canvases, paints, and paintbrushes into the great outdoors so they can paint amid the natural beauty that they wish to depict. Sometimes they will paint indoors, relying on their imaginations and feelings to guide the works of art they create. From landscapes, animals, gardens, rivers, seascapes and more, artists have a wide variety of natural subjects to depict in their works.

Nature art has been the subject of many of the greats, with some of the earliest landscape paintings in existence dating back to the 1500s. ___ to ___ to ____ have produced classic pieces of magnificent nature art although they weren’t considered “landscape artists.”

Famous landscape artists like Albert Bierstadt and Thomas Cole are known for their brilliant detail and realistic depiction of nature in their work. Others like __ and ___ were

The artists on this list were a combination of …….


Wheat Field with Cypresses by Vincent Van Gogh

Wheat Field with Cypresses (1889) by Vincent Van Gogh

Wheat Field with Cypresses (1889) by Vincent Van Gogh

Wheat Field with Cypresses by Vincent van Gogh features several motifs often explored by the artists in his landscape depictions. These include towering trees, swirling clouds, and rolling hills. In a letter to his brother, Theo, van Gogh describes the painting. “I have a canvas of cypresses with some ears of wheat, some poppies, a blue sky like a piece of Scotch plaid; the former painted with a thick impasto like the Monticelli’s, and the wheat field in the sun, which represents the extreme heat, very thick too.”


View of Toledo by El Greco

El Greco   ,     View of Toledo    , c. 1596–1600, oil on canvas,    Metropolitan Museum of Art   ,    New York

A Storm in the Rocky Mountains, Mt. Rosalie by Albert Bierstadt

A Storm in the Rocky Mountains, Mt. Rosalie, oil on canvas by Albert Bierstadt, 1866; in the Brooklyn Museum, New York City

A Storm in the Rocky Mountains, Mt. Rosalie, oil on canvas by Albert Bierstadt, 1866; in the Brooklyn Museum, New York City

Albert Bierstadt, a German-American painter associated with the Hudson River School movement, took many journeys to the American West, which inspired him to depict the rugged beauty of the great outdoors. Accordingly, he is also considered a member of the Rocky Mountain School art movement.

Some of Bierstadt’s most stirring works include “Yosemite Valley, Yosemite Park” which he completed around 1868 and which now hands in the Oakland Museum in Oakland, California, and the breathtaking “Storm in the Mountains,” finished around 1870. Other scenes inspired by nature are his “Lake Tahoe” and “San Francisco Bay.”


The Hay Wain by John Constable

The Hay Wain (1821) by John Constable

The Hay Wain (1821) by John Constable


Mont Sainte-Victoire by Paul Cezanne

Mont Sainte-Victoire, 1885-1887 by Paul Cezanne

Mont Sainte-Victoire, 1885-1887 by Paul Cezanne

Sainte-Victoire, a mountain in the South of France, remained Post-Impressionist painter Paul Cézanne’s preferred subject matter for years. In his series of oil paintings portraying the landform, he experiments with different views, color palettes, and perspectives to produce a comprehensive look at the mountain and its surrounding landscape. In this depiction from 1837, he frames the scene with trees in the foreground and a village in the distance.


View from Mount Holyoke, Northampton, Massachusetts, After A Thunderstorm by Thomas Cole

View from Mount Holyoke, Northampton, Massachusetts, After A Thunderstorm (1836) by Thomas Cole

View from Mount Holyoke, Northampton, Massachusetts, After A Thunderstorm (1836) by Thomas Cole



Poppy Field, Giverny by Claude Monet

Poppy Field, Giverny (1890–1891) by      Claude Monet     . Original from the Art Institute of Chicago

Poppy Field, Giverny (1890–1891) by Claude Monet. Original from the Art Institute of Chicago


Christina's World by Andrew Wyeth

Christina's World (1948) by Andrew Wyeth

Christina's World (1948) by Andrew Wyeth

Perhaps because it has been misunderstood as a depiction of teenage angst, for decades Christina's World was a dorm room poster staple. The woman actually depicted in the painting is Christina Olson, a woman who was paralyzed from the waist down as a result of a degenerative disease.


10 modern art movements and the artists that defined them

There were 10 distinct modern art movements that significantly shaped modern art.


Impressionism

Impressionism is a 19th-century art movement characterized by relatively small, thin, yet visible brush strokes, open composition, emphasis on accurate depiction of light in its changing qualities (often accentuating the effects of the passage of time), ordinary subject matter, inclusion of movement as a crucial element of human perception and experience, and unusual visual angles. Impressionism originated with a group of Paris-based artists whose independent exhibitions brought them to prominence during the 1870s and 1880s.

Boating, (1874) by Edouard Manet

Boating, (1874) by Edouard Manet

In 1874, a group of artists called the Anonymous Society of Painters, Sculptors, Printmakers, etc. organized an exhibition in Paris that launched the movement called Impressionism. Its founding members included Claude Monet, Edgar Degas, and Camille Pissarro, among others. The group was unified only by its independence from the official annual Salon, for which a jury of artists from the Académie des Beaux-Arts selected artworks and awarded medals. The independent artists, despite their diverse approaches to painting, appeared to contemporaries as a group. While conservative critics panned their work for its unfinished, sketchlike appearance, more progressive writers praised it for its depiction of modern life.

La Grenouillère, 1869 by Claude Monet

La Grenouillère, 1869 by Claude Monet


Post-Impressionism:


Fauvism:


Cubism:


Futurism:

Futurism is the movement in arts, originated from Italian painters shortly after world war one. They went ahead to oppose traditionalism and the sought to depicting the dynamic movement through the elimination and conventional formation through stressing speed, flux and the violence of machine age


Expressionism:

Expressionism is a modernist movement, initially in poetry and painting, originating in Germany at the beginning of the 20th century. Its typical trait is to present the world solely from a subjective perspective, distorting it radically for emotional effect in order to evoke moods or ideas.[1][2] Expressionist artists have sought to express the meaning[3] of emotional experience rather than physical reality.


Dadaism:


Surrealism:

Surrealism was the 20th century art movement that explored the hidden depths of the 'unconscious mind'. The Surrealists rejected the rational world as 'it only allows for the consideration of those facts relevant to our experience'. [1] They sought a new kind of reality, a heightened reality that they called 'surreality', which was found in the world of images drawn from their dreams and imagination.


Abstract Expressionism:

"Abstract Expressionism" was never an ideal label for the movement, which developed in New York in the 1940s and 1950s. It was somehow meant to encompass not only the work of painters who filled their canvases with fields of color and abstract forms, but also those who attacked their canvases with a vigorous gestural expressionism. Still Abstract Expressionism has become the most accepted term for a group of artists who held much in common.

Political instability in Europe in the 1930s brought several leading Surrealists to New York, and many of the Abstract Expressionists were profoundly influenced by Surrealism's focus on mining the unconscious. It encouraged their interest in myth and archetypal symbols and it shaped their understanding of painting itself as a struggle between self-expression and the chaos of the subconscious.


Pop Art:


American Art: 10 of the most famous American paintings of all time

American Art history stretches from the earliest indigenous cultures to the more recent globalization of contemporary art. Centuries before the first European colonizers, Native American peoples had crafted ritual and utilitarian objects that reflected the natural environment and their beliefs.

After the arrival of Europeans, artists looked to European tendencies in portraiture and landscape painting to craft representations of the new land, but it was not until the middle of the 19th century with the Hudson River School that American artists were considered to have launched a cohesive movement.

Through the early 20th century, artists still took cues from European avant-garde groups but increasingly focused on the denizens of American urban centers and the more rural Midwest. After World War II, the artists that comprised the Abstract Expressionist movement found international fame and notoriety, and for the first time, American artistic influence moved abroad, and later Minimalism and Pop Art greatly impacted the art world. Subsequently, with various global art centers and international connections, it is now more difficult to point to a specific American art trend, although one can still chart the influence of American artists in the global art sphere.

Early American paintings were primarily portraits, landscapes and depictions of historical events. But it wasn’t until the early 20th century when the first prominent art movement mad The first prominent art movement in the United States was Realism, which originated in France in the 1850s and became important in America by early 20th century. American Realists depicted contemporary social realities and the lives and everyday activities of ordinary people. The best known paintings of the movement include Hopper’s Nighthawks and Wyeth’s Christina’s World. Abstract Expressionism was the first specifically American movement to achieve international influence. It incorporated a variety of styles and emphasized on conveying strong emotional or expressive content through abstraction. The best known figure of the movement was Jackson Pollock. Another major American art movement of the 20th century was the Pop Art movement which focused on popular culture. Its most famous works include Warhol’s Marilyn Diptych and Lichtenstein’s Whaam! Know more about the contribution of American artists to the art world through the 10 most famous paintings.


#1: American Gothic by Grant Wood

American Gothic (1930) by Grant Wood

American Gothic (1930) by Grant Wood

Perhaps the most recognizable piece of American artwork is the American Gothic painting by Grant Wood. Painted in the 1930s, this iconic masterpiece epitomizes American social realism during . As famous as any Renaissance piece in America and a staple feature at every Halloween costume party. American Gothic a symbol of the middle American simple life.


#2: Whistler’s Mother by James Abbott McNeill Whistler

Whistler’s Mother (1871) by James Abbott McNeill Whistler

Whistler’s Mother (1871) by James Abbott McNeill Whistler

This classic portrait by James Whistler of his own mother, is often dubbed “the American” Mona Lisa.


#3: Nighthawks by Edward Hopper

Nighthawks (1942) by Edward Hopper

Nighthawks (1942) by Edward Hopper

Edward Hopper, the most famous American realist, is best known for revealing the solitude of modern life and forcing the viewer to play a more active role in completing the narrative of artworks. His art is marked by minimum of action with almost no sign of life and mobility; and the use of dramatic means to suggest the psychological states of his subjects. This painting, which portrays people in a downtown diner late at night, was inspired by a restaurant on Greenwich Avenue, the artist’s neighborhood in Manhattan. It has been interpreted as an illustration of the chilling effects of the Second World War and as a portrayal of the isolation of an individual amid the bustle of New York City. The most famous work of Hopper, Nighthawks is one of the most recognizable paintings in American art. It influenced many future American artists and has been widely referenced and parodied in popular culture.

http://mentalfloss.com/article/63967/15-things-you-might-not-know-about-nighthawks


#4: George Washington by Gilbert Stuart

George Washington (1796) by Gilbert Stuart

George Washington (1796) by Gilbert Stuart

Stuart's painting is the exemplar for Washington's portrait on the dollar bill. It is thus arguably the most reproduced American painting of all time. Stuart was also concerned with the dollar. Recognizing the appeal of his Athenaeum portrait of Washington, he chose not to finish it; instead, he devoted his time to making as many copies of it as possible.


#5: Freedom From Want (The Thanksgiving Picture) by Norman Rockwell

Freedom From Want (The Thanksgiving Picture) (1943) by Norman Rockwell

Freedom From Want (The Thanksgiving Picture) (1943) by Norman Rockwell

In 1943, Norman Rockwell created four paintings corresponding to the four freedoms mentioned by U.S. President Franklin D. Roosevelt in his famous 1941 speech. Freedom from Want is the third and most renowned painting of the series. It depicts a multi-generational family gathered around a dinner table for a holiday meal. The grandmother is about to set the turkey down while the grandfather looks on with fondness and is ready to carve it. The people in the picture are friends and family of Rockwell, who were photographed individually and painted into the scene. Freedom from Want became a symbol of “family togetherness, peace, and plenty”. Artistically, it is highly regarded as an example of mastery of the challenges of white-on-white painting. Freedom from Want has become the most famous representation of Thanksgiving in America and it has been adapted and parodied numerous times. However, it is not exclusively associated with Thanksgiving and is also known as I’ll Be Home for Christmas.

Rockwell painted a quartet of canvases for the Four Freedoms Series inspired by an FDR speech; the Four Freedoms included freedom of expression, freedom of worship, freedom from fear, and freedom from want. Freedom from Want was reproduced in an edition of the Saturday Evening Post, a place where many Americans saw Rockwell's iconic domestic images. This painting is emblematic of Rockwell's disturbing nostalgia: all is mostly well, except for the strange-looking boy in the back rear of the composition.


#6: Whaam! by Roy Lichtenstein

Whaam! (1963) by Roy Lichtenstein

Whaam! (1963) by Roy Lichtenstein

Pop Art appreciates popular culture as opposed to elitist culture. It is characterized by bright colors and use of recognizable imagery from popular culture like advertisements, celebrities and comic book characters. Roy Lichtenstein is the most famous American Pop Art artist after Andy Warhol and Whaam! is his most renowned work. The painting is one among several works by the artist which depict aerial combat. Lichtenstein had a three year stint in the United States army from 1943 to 1946 and Whaam! is inspired by an illustration of comic-book illustrator Irv Novick, whom he met during this period. Inspired by images of comic books, the painting shows a fighter plane firing a rocket which hits another plane to blow it up in flames. Whaam! is noted for combining brilliant color and narrative situation. It “documents while it gently parodies the familiar hero images of modern America.”


#7: The Veteran in a New Field by Winslow Homer

The Veteran in a New Field (1865) by Winslow Homer

The Veteran in a New Field (1865) by Winslow Homer

Painted soon after General Robert E. Lee’s surrender on April 9, 1865, and President Abraham Lincoln’s assassination five days later, Homer’s canvas depicts an emblematic farmer, revealed to be a Union veteran as well by his discarded jacket and canteen at the lower right. His old-fashioned scythe evokes the Grim Reaper, recalling the war’s harvest of death and expressing grief at Lincoln’s murder. A redemptive feature is the bountiful wheat—a northern crop—which could connote the Union’s victory. Referring to death and life, Homer’s iconic composition offers a powerful meditation on America’s sacrifices and its potential for recovery.


#8: Christina's World by Andrew Wyeth

Christina's World (1948) by Andrew Wyeth

Christina's World (1948) by Andrew Wyeth

Perhaps because it has been misunderstood as a depiction of teenage angst, for decades Christina's World was a dorm room poster staple. The woman actually depicted in the painting is Christina Olson, a woman who was paralyzed from the waist down as a result of a degenerative disease. Wyeth imbues the scene with emotion -- even for the viewer who is unaware of Olson's plight -- through the taut, yet invisible line stretching between her head and the peak of the house. Christina's destination seems impossibly far away.


#9: Cow’s Skull, Red, White & Blue by Georgia O’Keefe

Cow’s Skull: Red, White & Blue (1931) by Georgia O’Keefe

Cow’s Skull: Red, White & Blue (1931) by Georgia O’Keefe

O’Keeffe depicts a cow skull at the center of the painting with the three colors of the American flag behind it. The picture has since become a quintessential icon of the American West. Her artistic interests shifted from the buildings of New York to the nature of New Mexico. In this work, O’Keeffe isolates a single skull, highlighting its jagged edges, worn surfaces, and bleached color. To O’Keeffe, such bones represented the desert’s enduring beauty and the strength of the American spirit, which is alluded to in the striped background.


#10: Barack Obama/Hope by Shepard Fairey

Barack Obama/Hope (2008) by Shepard Fairey

Barack Obama/Hope (2008) by Shepard Fairey


What is the Chicano Art Movement?

Chicano and Chicana Art.jpg

The Chicano Art Movement is the artistic expression by Mexican-American artists as influenced by the Chicano Movement (El Movimiento), which began in the 1960s. Chicano art, conveys common themes in the Mexican American struggle, from immigration, abuses of undocumented immigrants and the militarization of the border. Because immigration and the border are political issues that are currently ….

Geography, immigration and displacement are a common themes in Chicano art.[7] Taking an activist approach, artists illustrate the historical presence of Mexicans and indigenous peoples in the Southwest, human rights abuses of undocumented immigrants, racial profiling, and the militarization of the border. “Many Chicano artists have focused on the dangers of the border, often using barbed wire as a direct metaphorical representation of the painful and contradictory experiences of Chicanos caught between two cultures”.

Another expression of Chicano identity through their art is their depictions of life in the barrio - Spanish-speaking, Latino neighborhoods in a city or town. Often the barrios, as ethnic enclaves, have long histories of dislocation, marginalization, poverty, and inequity in access social services. In the United States, barrios can also refer to the geographical “turf” claimed by Latino gangs, most commonly limited to Chicano gangs in California.

Chicano art even embraced the vandalistic expressions of graffiti. Art in the barrio also incorporates graffiti as a form of artistic expression, often associated with subcultures that rebel against authority.

Chicano artists also use graffiti as a tool, to express their political opinions, indigenous heritage, cultural and religious imagery, and counter-narratives to dominant portrayals of Chicano life in the barrios.

https://theculturetrip.com/north-america/usa/california/articles/l-a-s-8-most-influential-chicana-and-chicano-artists/

Rasquache

Rasquache art uses the most basic, simplest, quickest, and crudest means necessary to create the desired expression, in essence, creating the most from the least. The term can also be used to reference the bicultural inspiration from which these artists draw inspiration. Rasquachismo," suited to overcoming material and professional limitations faced by artists in the movement. It is the "view of the underdog, which combines inventiveness with a survivalist attitude."

The Big Three Painters that that led the Mexican Muralist Art Movement

The Mexican mural movement, or Mexican muralism, began as a government-funded form of public art—specifically, large-scale wall paintings in civic buildings—in the wake of the Mexican Revolution (1910–20). Three big muralists, also known as “The Big Three,” ——. Though muralism was a national project, the work of these three artists gave Mexico—which had previously been viewed as something of a cultural backwater—an internationally recognized movement with a unique contribution to twentieth-century modernism.

Diego Rivera, is probably the most well known artists from the Mexican Muralist movement, but he was in great company. The renowned husband of Frida Kahlo is considered one of “the three” key leaders of Mexican Muralism alongside José Clemente and David Alfaro Siqueiros.

Mexican Muralism began in the 1920s and continues to this day and is a significant part of the Mexican art culture. Mexican Muralism conveyed political and social messages of unification following the Mexican Revolution and were chartered by ….

https://www.widewalls.ch/mexican-muralism-muralists/


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Diego Rivera

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5 of the most iconic works of street photography

…and the story behind each

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Vivian Maier

One of the most famous nannies in the world photographs a boy feeding pigeons in 1950s Chicago. Armed with her double lens Rolleiflex she wandered through the streets of Chicago capturing the raw emotions of others. Described as a loner she was able to record the unique scenes and feelings of the Chicago citizen.


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Garry Winogrand

The most famous picture of Marilyn Monroe was actually taken by the Street Photographer Garry Winogrand. During the promotion of her new movie Seven Year Itch, Garry Winogrand snapped this “accident” that still makes people’s heads spin.


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Robert Frank

His famous picture of a bus depicts the segregation still intact in the 1950s in America. The facial expression of the white boy and black man are very alike, while the woman in the front almost snobbishly looks at the photographer.


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Alfred Eisenstaedt

The “Victory Day over Japan” was photographed by Alfred Eisenstaedt on the New York Times Square in 1945. He describes the creation of this photo as followed:

“In Times Square on V.J. Day, I saw a sailor running along the street grabbing every girl in sight. Whether she was a grandmother, stout, thin, old, didn’t make any difference. I was running ahead of him with my Leica looking back over my shoulder. But none of the pictures that were possible pleased me. Then suddenly, in a flash, I saw something white being grabbed. I turned around and clicked the moment the sailor kissed the nurse. If she had been dressed in a dark dress I would never have taken the picture. If the sailor had worn a white uniform, the same. I took exactly four pictures. It was done within a few seconds.”


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Eddie Adams

Shows a life fading away during an execution in Saigon. His image became one of the most published during the Vietnam War, granting him the Pulitzer Prize in 1969. It shows the Chief of National Police of South Vietnam executing a Viet Cong Captain who allegedly manslaughter the former’s family before.

 

6 Black Artists that lead the Harlem Renaissance

The Harlem Renaissance was a pivotal moment in African American History. In the early 20th century, the neighborhood of Harlem began to emerge as the premier black metropolis and a black cultural mecca in the United States. This development was followed by the intellectual, social and artistic explosion of African American culture which erupted in the neighborhood and spread across the cities of the greater Midwest – what we today refer to as the Harlem Renaissance and was initially known as the New Negro Movement.

This fruitful time saw the blossoming of a myriad of talents by an astonishing array of African American artists, writers and musicians free from the constraints of the dominant white culture. Critic and teacher Alain Locke described it as a “spiritual coming of age” in which the African American community was able to seize upon its “first chances for group expression and self-determination.”

With racism still a major problem and with limited economic opportunities available to them, African Americans used creative expression to voice their opinions and broadcast their ability to create great works of art. Jobs were plentiful in cities in the United States in the years between World War I and the Great Depression, especially in the northern states.

The Great Migration began as disenfranchisement and Jim Crow laws led many African Americans to hope for a new life up north. Almost 750,000 African Americans left the South and migrated to urban areas, like New York, to take advantage of their growing prosperity. Harlem attracted nearly 175,000 African Americans, making it one of the largest concentrations of black people in the world at the time.

#1: Jacob Lawrence

To Preserve Their Freedom, from Toussain L'Ouverture series, serigraph, 1988-1997 by Jacob Lawrence

To Preserve Their Freedom, from Toussain L'Ouverture series, serigraph, 1988-1997 by Jacob Lawrence


#2: Lois Mailou Jones

The Butte Montmartre - Lois Mailou Jones © Irina/flickr

The Butte Montmartre - Lois Mailou Jones © Irina/flickr


#3: Allan Rohan Crite

School’s Out by Allan Rohan Crite

School’s Out by Allan Rohan Crite


#4: Aaron Douglas

“Let My People Go” by Aaron Douglas

“Let My People Go” by Aaron Douglas

Not only was Aaron Douglas a leader in the Harlem Renaissance, he is also widely noted as the forefather of black art in America! Born and raised in Kansas during…his work captured a lot of the black struggle at the time.


#5: Ellis Wilson

Jac…… by Ellis Wilson

Jac…… by Ellis Wilson


#6: Archibald Motley

Nightlife (1943) by Archibald Motley © Valerie Gerrard Browne / Chicago History Museum / Bridgeman Images

Nightlife (1943) by Archibald Motley © Valerie Gerrard Browne / Chicago History Museum / Bridgeman Images

e is most famous for his colorful chronicling of the African-American experience during the 1920s and 1930s, and is considered one of the major contributors to the Harlem Renaissance,