5 Top Cubist Artists (Besides Picasso) we love

While may not be able to define Cubism, you’ve probably seen some famous cubism art. If you know Pablo Picasso, you should know Cubism. Pablo P

But let’s define cubism.

Cubism is an early-20th-century avant-garde art movement that revolutionized European painting and sculpture, and inspired related movements in musicliterature and architecture. Cubism has been considered the most influential art movement of the 20th century.[1][2] The term is broadly used in association with a wide variety of art produced in Paris (Montmartre and Montparnasse) or near Paris (Puteaux) during the 1910s and throughout the 1920s.

The movement was pioneered by Pablo Picasso and Georges Braque, joined by Jean MetzingerAlbert GleizesRobert DelaunayHenri Le Fauconnier, and Fernand Léger.[3] One primary influence that led to Cubism was the representation of three-dimensional form in the late works of Paul Cézanne.[4] A retrospective of Cézanne's paintings had b

#1: Georges Braque

While Picasso may be the most well-known Cubist artist, Georges Braques, along with Picasso, are considered the forefathers of Cubism.

Bottles and Fishes (1910) by Georges Braque

Bottles and Fishes (1910) by Georges Braque

#2: Jean Metzinger

Le Goûter (Tea Time) (1911) by Jean Metzinger

Le Goûter (Tea Time) (1911) by Jean Metzinger

#3: Fernand Léger

The City (1911) by Fernand Léger

The City (1911) by Fernand Léger

#4: Henri Le Fauconnier

Little Schoolgirl, 1907 by Henri Le Fauconnier

Little Schoolgirl, 1907 by Henri Le Fauconnier

#5: Robert Delaunay

Nu à la toilette, 1915 by Robert Delaunay

Nu à la toilette, 1915 by Robert Delaunay